Tag Archives: International Laser Class Association

ILCA Announces List of New Builder Applicants

From the International Laser Class Association:

As a result of antitrust actions brought in Europe, and in order to comply with EU Regulations, World Sailing now requires that any interested party that meets the necessary technical qualifications and regulatory requirements must be able to manufacture and sell the boats named as equipment for the Olympic Games. For ILCA, this World Sailing policy has required some changes in how builders are determined and approved to manufacturer class-legal equipment.

World Sailing’s Olympic Equipment Policy requires that the Olympic sailing classes have a process in place by which “any interested party who meets the necessary technical qualifications and regulatory requirements must be able to manufacture and sell Olympic equipment.” Further, the manufacturer selection process must be defined on a fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory basis.

To implement World Sailing’s policy, ILCA has now established the necessary procedures for bringing on new builders.  The primary focus throughout this process is to maintain and ensure the one-design principle that is the foundation of our class – that all boats are built to the same strict standards regardless of the manufacturer.

ILCA is pleased to announce that, under the terms of the new builder approval procedure, seven manufacturers will now be offered provisional licenses to move forward in the builder application process. The provisional approvals come after the formal builder applications were reviewed by the evaluation panel appointed by ILCA, which is comprised of both class technical representatives and independent industry experts.

The manufacturers approved to move forward in the application process are (in alphabetical order):
Devoti Sailing s.r.o. (Poland)
Element 6 Evolution Co Ltd  (Thailand)
Nautivela srl (Italy)
Ovington Boats Ltd (United Kingdom)
Qindao Zou Inter Marine Co., Ltd (China)
Rio tecna srl (Argentina)
Zim Sailing (United States)

Each builder applicant is now subject to a further technical review to ensure compliance with the established class one-design principles. The new manufacturers will now be required to obtain certified molds and tooling from ILCA and produce a number of pre-production boats to verify the ability to manufacturer boats to the strict specifications and tolerances of the building manual and the class rules. Under the terms of the Olympic Equipment Policy, there are other applicants in the approval process at this time that may also receive provisional approval. ILCA will provide further updates as this process moves forward.

ILCA: Update on New Builder Approvals

From the International Laser Class Association:

ILCA is pleased to announce that, under the terms of the new builder approval procedure, seven manufacturers will now be offered provisional licenses to move forward in the builder application process. The provisional approvals come after the formal builder applications were reviewed by the evaluation panel appointed by ILCA, which is comprised of both class technical representatives and independent industry experts.

Each builder applicant is now subject to a further technical review to ensure compliance with the established class one-design principles. The new manufacturers will now be required to obtain certified molds and tooling from ILCA and produce a number of pre-production boats to verify the ability to manufacturer boats to the strict specifications and tolerances of the building manual and the class rules.

ILCA is excited about the opportunities for growth these new manufacturers bring and will provide further updates as the approval process progresses.

Laser Class Rule Change Vote 7/31 Deadline

D11 sailors –

If you have not yet voted for the ILCA rule change please visit the website to vote before the deadline on Wednesday, July 31st.

This rule serves 3 important purposes –

  1. Makes sure that our class will remain in the Olympics
  2. Ensures that class-legal equipment is available in ALL parts of the world
  3. Gives control of our class to the sailors, not the commercial parties.

Please vote yes for this important change.  Voting is limited to current class members, but if your membership has lapsed, you can rejoin and then vote.  Voting takes just a couple minutes.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2019ILCARuleChange

If you have any questions/comments – please let Jon know.

 

International Laser Class Association Removes LaserPerformance as Builder

From the International Laser Class Association:

International Laser Class Association Removes Laser Performance as Approved Builder

ILCA is seeking new builders to complement its existing network of manufacturers, the International Laser Class Association (ILCA) announced today. The move comes after longtime builder of the class dinghy, Laser Performance (Europe) Limited (LPE), breached the terms of the Laser Construction Manual Agreement (LCMA), which seeks to ensure the identical nature of all Laser class boats, regardless of where they are built.

“We’re disappointed to see such a long and productive relationship come to an end, but we had to move ahead in order to protect the level of competition and the investment for the 14,000 members of the International Laser Class and the more than 50,000 sailors around the world who regularly sail the Laser dinghy,” said Class President Tracy Usher. With its UK-based manufacturing facility, LPE was the ILCA-approved builder that produced boats for most of Europe, Asia and the Americas until earlier this week, when Usher says the class terminated the LCMA with respect to LPE after the builder’s refusal to allow inspection of the boats being built in their manufacturing facility as required by that contract.

“The very heart of our class is the ability for any sailor to race any other on an equal playing field, and the only way we can guarantee that level of parity is by ensuring that all builders are producing the boat in strict accordance with the Laser Construction Manual,” explained Usher, who said that LPE has unequivocally denied the class their right to access to LPE’s factory. “It’s the same for every class of one-design racing boat: if we can’t be sure that they are all the same, we have no class left,” said Usher, who said that LPE left the class “no option.”

Fortunately for sailors around the world, there are already two other manufacturers of class legal boats, one in Japan and another in Australia. According to Chris Caldecoat, General Manager of Performance Sailcraft Australia (PSA), his company is able to take up the slack if needed. “PSA has sufficient capacity to supply the market until new builders are appointed in Europe and around the world,” Caldecoat said. “We have and will always do what is right for the sailors and the sport.”

“Doing what’s right for the sailors” is really all that matters, according to ILCA Executive Secretary Eric Faust, who emphasized that there will be no disruptions to the the 2020 Olympics or to any major ILCA event. “Performance Sailcraft Japan will supply all the boats for the Olympic competitions in Tokyo, while the next two World Championships are in regions with Performance Sailcraft factories. These are existing, class-approved builders so we expect no issues,” said Faust. “We’re confident that we’ll see new builders coming on line soon, and that we’ll once again have a robust dealer network around the world in plenty of time for the lead up to the 2024 Olympics,” he added. With PSA and PSJ supplying boats and parts to sailors formerly served by Laser Performance over the next few months, Faust expects the disruption to class owners to be minimal or non-existent.

ILCA understands that many of our sailors will have additional questions about this news. Please know that we plan to post a FAQ with more detailed information soon. Finally, ILCA would like to thank all of our sailors, coaches, members and enthusiasts for their support of the class over the years and we look forward to a prosperous future ahead.

2017 ILCA Rule Changes Vote

All current ILCA members worldwide are invited to vote on 2017 Rule Changes now, via a quick, 4-question online survey.

Voting is open 10 April to 10 October 2017.

Click here to view rule changes and cast your vote.

ELECTRONIC DIGITAL COMPASS

Proposed rule change: Proposed rule change: Delete current Rule 22 (a)-(d) shown below in strikethrough text and replace it with new Rule 22 (a)-(e) shown below in RED text.

Add new rule 22:
22. COMPASS, ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT AND TIMING DEVICES
(a) One compass mounted on any part of the deck or the cockpit is permitted if the hull cavity is not pierced by anything other than the fasteners. Compasses may not be fitted to inspection ports. An additional wrist mounted compass is permitted. Electronic, self-contained, digital compasses using only magnetic input are permitted.
(b) Timing devices are permitted.
(c) A timing device and electronic compass may be integrated in the same device.
(d) A compass or timing device must not be capable of displaying, delivering, transmitting, receiving, calculating, correlating or storing information about wind speed, wind direction, boat speed or boat position.
(e) Any use of electronic equipment not specifically allowed in the rules is prohibited unless the rules are modified by the sailing instructions.

Delete Old Rule 22:
(a) One compass is permitted mounted on any part of the deck or the cockpit, provided that the hull cavity is not pierced by anything other than the fasteners. Compasses shall not be fitted to inspection ports. Electronic and digital compasses are prohibited (see exception in part d).
(b) Any use of electronic equipment not specifically allowed in the rules is prohibited unless modified in the sailing instructions.
(c) Timing devices are permitted.
(d) A timing device that includes an electronic compass is permitted as long as it is worn on the wrist.

Reason for change: To allow the use of affordable electronic digital compasses that are not GPS enabled.

* 3 BOAT OR BODY MOUNTED CAMERA

Proposed rule change: Add new Rule 28 in RED text as below.

ADD NEW RULE 28:
28. One camera may be attached to the sailor or may be mounted on the boat if the hull cavity is not pierced by anything other than the fasteners.

Reason for change: To allow the use of cameras.

* 4 SHOCK CORD INHAUL

Proposed rule change: Modify Rule 3(f)vi by deleting the words in strikethrough text and adding the words in RED text as below.

vi. A shock cord for use as an inhaul may be attached around the boom immediately in front of the outhaul cleat or to the outhaul cleat and then to the clew of the sail, the clew tie down, the optional block at the clew, the quick release system or through the clew of the sail and to an optional block in the primary control line.  A shock cord may be used as an inhaul on the clew.

Reason for change: To remove the restrictions on the attachment points of the shock cord inhaul.

* 5 ADJUSTABLE HIKING STRAP

Proposed rule change: Modify Rule 17c by adding the words shown in RED text as below.

New Rule 17C:
17c The hiking strap supporting line, between the aft end of the hiking strap and the eye straps on the aft face of the cockpit, may be rigged in any manner so that the hiking strap is fixed or adjustable and may include one cleat; one ring, thimble, or shackle; or both.

Reason for change: To allow for the addition of one cleat and one turning point in the hiking strap support line that are not attached to the hull or the hiking strap.

Example of Possible Hiking Strap Adjustment Configuration

<span style="font-family: tahoma, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Example of Possible Hiking Strap Adjustment Configuration</span>

New composite top mast section announced

Laser Class Announces New Composite Top Mast

The class legal composite mast will be available in early 2017.

5 December 2016

The International Laser Class Association (ILCA) is pleased to announce the release of a class-legal composite top mast section that is expected to be available for purchase in early 2017.

Because the new mast was designed with the exact same weight and bend characteristics as the existing aluminum upper sections, it will not provide a performance advantage but instead will eliminate the permanent bending problems associated with the aluminum spars.

“ILCA’s policy regarding the introduction of new equipment is that it should always have the same characteristics as the existing equipment and that the new equipment should not give a performance advantage when raced alongside existing equipment,” says ILCA Executive Secretary, Eric Faust. “The composite mast definitely meets that objective. It’s been tested by some of the top Laser sailors in the world and they all agree that they can’t determine any difference while sailing.”

According to ILCA Technical Officer, Clive Humphris, “The new top section has been rigorously developed and tested over the past six years to assure that it is a ‘like-for-like’ part with the current mast. The advantage is that the new mast will be much more durable and won’t be prone to permanent bending like the aluminum masts.”

ILCA President, Tracy Usher, agrees. “I’ve sailed with a prototype composite upper while training in a wide variety of conditions — I couldn’t tell any difference between having this spar on the boat or using an aluminum one. I sail the same way and the boat seems to behave the same way. Everything felt the same.”

“This is going to make Laser sailing easier for everyone,” adds Usher. “Sailors won’t need to carefully align their mast rivet when rigging or worry about straightening their masts after a day of heavy air sailing. It’s going to be a big improvement for everyone!”

Because the composite mast is now a fully approved change to the Laser Construction Manual, there is no need for a change to the Laser Class Rules. As long as the mast is purchased from an approved Laser Builder or one of its authorized dealers, it will be legal for use at all ILCA sanctioned events.

The new mast specifications have been developed in close cooperation between the approved Laser Builders, World Sailing and ILCA. Because the composite top section is class legal and it will not provide any advantage in performance on the water, neither ILCA nor World Sailing anticipate that the use of the composite mast will need to be restricted for any future events. If it is subsequently determined that the use of the mast needs to be restricted, this will be controlled by Notice of Race on an event-by-event basis.

For more information contact ILCA:

office@laserinternational.org